kraddyodaddy:

Adderall vs. Cocaine

kraddyodaddy:

Adderall vs. Cocaine

Buckfast Tonic Wine: (from Wikipedia) Buckfast contains 15% alcohol in the 750 ml green-bottled UK version, and 14.8% in the brown-bottled Republic of Ireland version, which equates to roughly 11.25 UK units of alcohol.
Both variants of the drink contain disodium phosphate. Sodium and potassium glycerophosphate are salts of glycerol 3-phosphate, a biologically important sugar which has a role in cellular energy metabolism. Both glycerol-3-phosphate and its close relative 3-phosphoglycerate are intermediaries in the glycolysis pathway, the major biochemical pathway for energy production in animals. Glycerophosphate is used in intravenous drip solutions as a source of phosphate, a biologically important ion used in energy-requiring reactions.
The “brown bottle” Buckfast has a caffeine content about equal to brewed or percolated coffee, while the “green bottle” Buckfast has a caffeine content about equal to black tea. However independent research says the “green bottle” Buckfast contains the same amount of caffeine as six cups of coffee and Buckfast—drop for drop—has more caffeine in it than Red Bull.

Buckfast Tonic Wine: (from Wikipedia) Buckfast contains 15% alcohol in the 750 ml green-bottled UK version, and 14.8% in the brown-bottled Republic of Ireland version, which equates to roughly 11.25 UK units of alcohol.

Both variants of the drink contain disodium phosphate. Sodium and potassium glycerophosphate are salts of glycerol 3-phosphate, a biologically important sugar which has a role in cellular energy metabolism. Both glycerol-3-phosphate and its close relative 3-phosphoglycerate are intermediaries in the glycolysis pathway, the major biochemical pathway for energy production in animals. Glycerophosphate is used in intravenous drip solutions as a source of phosphate, a biologically important ion used in energy-requiring reactions.

The “brown bottle” Buckfast has a caffeine content about equal to brewed or percolated coffee, while the “green bottle” Buckfast has a caffeine content about equal to black tea. However independent research says the “green bottle” Buckfast contains the same amount of caffeine as six cups of coffee and Buckfast—drop for drop—has more caffeine in it than Red Bull.

From Wikipedia:
D-IX was a cocaine-based experimental drug cocktail developed by the Nazis in 1944 for military application.[1] Nazi doctors found that equipment-laden test subjects who had taken the drug could march 88.5 kilometers (55 miles) without resting before they collapsed. Each tablet contained 5 mg of oxycodone (brand name Eukodal), 5 mg of cocaine and 3 mg of methamphetamine (then called Pervitin, now available under the brandname Desoxyn).[2] The researcher who uncovered the project, Wolf Kemper, said: “The aim was to use D-IX to redefine the limits of human endurance.”[3] Test subjects could march in a circle for up to 90 kilometers per day without rest while carrying a 20 kilogram backpack.[4] Nazi doctors were enthusiastic about the results, and planned to supply all German troops with the pills, but the war ended before D-IX could be put into mass production, though it did see limited use among a handful of Neger and Biber pilots.[2]
did-you-kno:

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I can already see the jokes for those who are using it to skip sleep. “What, you’re up another day? You sucking down dix or what?”

From Wikipedia:

D-IX was a cocaine-based experimental drug cocktail developed by the Nazis in 1944 for military application.[1] Nazi doctors found that equipment-laden test subjects who had taken the drug could march 88.5 kilometers (55 miles) without resting before they collapsed. Each tablet contained 5 mg of oxycodone (brand name Eukodal), 5 mg of cocaine and 3 mg of methamphetamine (then called Pervitin, now available under the brandname Desoxyn).[2] The researcher who uncovered the project, Wolf Kemper, said: “The aim was to use D-IX to redefine the limits of human endurance.”[3] Test subjects could march in a circle for up to 90 kilometers per day without rest while carrying a 20 kilogram backpack.[4] Nazi doctors were enthusiastic about the results, and planned to supply all German troops with the pills, but the war ended before D-IX could be put into mass production, though it did see limited use among a handful of Neger and Biber pilots.[2]

did-you-kno:

 Source

I can already see the jokes for those who are using it to skip sleep. “What, you’re up another day? You sucking down dix or what?”

did-you-kno:

Source

Read: Sleep is mortal, and it can be killed without killing the host body that this parasite feeds on.

did-you-kno:

Source

Read: Sleep is mortal, and it can be killed without killing the host body that this parasite feeds on.

did-you-kno:

Source
“DRINK COFFEE: Do Stupid Thing Faster With More Energy”
One of the many “crack my ass up” signs at Genuine Joe Coffeehouse in Austin, Texas.

DRINK COFFEE: Do Stupid Thing Faster With More Energy

One of the many “crack my ass up” signs at Genuine Joe Coffeehouse in Austin, Texas.

“Death Before Decaf" — Found on a T-shirt at Genuine Joe Coffeehouse in Austin, Texas. Also [Here on Instagram]

Death Before Decaf" — Found on a T-shirt at Genuine Joe Coffeehouse in Austin, Texas. Also [Here on Instagram]

"This morning, with her, having coffee."
Johnny Cash, (when asked to define Paradise).

"This morning, with her, having coffee."

Johnny Cash, (when asked to define Paradise).

(via liliyi)

did-you-kno:

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All please. Now.

All please. Now.

(via integrityvsdespair)

mainart:

(Animating Internet Images) Gif, 2013 Ibon Mainar

mainart:

(Animating Internet Images) Gif, 2013 Ibon Mainar

From “Here are the fifteen professions that drink the most coffee" on io9. I find it funny that I fit into a few different places on this list, BOTH in the coffee consumption AND in profession.

From “Here are the fifteen professions that drink the most coffee" on io9. I find it funny that I fit into a few different places on this list, BOTH in the coffee consumption AND in profession.

(via namuko)

Brain pulses stimulate deep sleep

Brain pulses stimulate deep sleep

Woman sleeping
Deep sleep is important for learning

A good night’s sleep may be as simple as flipping a switch, say scientists.

By sending magnetic pulses through the skulls of sleeping volunteers, US researchers were able to stimulate the slow brain waves seen in deep sleep.

Such a machine-generated “power nap” could one day be an insomnia treatment, the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences study suggests.

However, it is unclear whether electronically assisted sleep confers the same benefits as natural sleep.

The deepest stage of sleep is characterised by brain patterns known as slow wave activity - electrical waves which wash across the brain, roughly once a second, 1,000 times a night.

Slow wave activity is believed to be critical to the restoration of mood and the ability to learn, think and remember.

 With a single pulse, we were able to induce a wave that looks identical to the waves the brain makes normally during sleep 
Professor Giulio Tononi

Professor Giulio Tononi and colleagues used a technique called transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) - a harmless magnetic signal which activates electrical impulses in the brain - to initiate slow waves in sleeping volunteers.

They then recorded brain electrical activity.

In response to each magnetic pulse, the participants’ brains immediately produced the slow waves typical of deep sleep.

The researchers managed to position the TMS device to cause slow waves to travel throughout the brain.

'Restorative powers'

Professor Tononi, from the University of Wisconsin said slow waves may be important in sleep’s “restorative powers”.

He said a sleep-deprived person has larger and more numerous slow waves once asleep.

And as sleep proceeds, the slow waves weaken, which may signal that the need for sleep is partially satisfied.

"With a single pulse, we were able to induce a wave that looks identical to the waves the brain makes normally during sleep."

He added that creating slow waves on demand could one day lead to treatments for insomnia, where slow waves may be reduced, or a magnetically stimulated “power nap,” which might confer the benefit of eight hours sleep in just a few hours.

But he said researchers must first discover if artificial slow waves have restorative benefits to the brain, and the team are planning further experiments.

Dr Chris Idzikowski, director of the Edinburgh Sleep Centre said the notion of trying to support deep sleep was sound.

"Out of all the stages of sleep we think that’s the one that provides the basic biological function of recovery.

"But just mimicking sleep waves doesn’t mean you’re providing the same functions of sleep."